Kim Kardashian had her fourth baby last year ,via surrogate.

We are not here to shame her, or to blame her. However I think this is a perfect example of how a loving, devoted, not first time mother, with loads of money, professional help and support…can get it this wrong.

There are so many rules and guidelines these days. And our moms and grandma’s always follow up with a “back in my day.” All we can say is, know better do better! We know what keeps babies safe, and it’s only following a few simple rules.

So we’re going to analyze this photo, and point out what’s unsafe and how it can be done correctly. NOT to shame, but to educate. We’ll start from the outside in.

Bumpers:

Crib and bassinet bumpers are not safe. They prevent airflow, could potentially come undone [loose strings would be a huge Nono] and baby could nuzzle his face into them. Even brand new babies can tend to wiggle close to the sides of their sleep space throughout the night. [Mesh breathable bumpers are not recommended either. But some exasperated parents choose to use them if an older baby keeps losing his Paci through the bars in the night, or getting a leg stuck.]

Positioner:

This is a different version of the popular Doc-A-Tot. It is not recommended for sleep and not regarded as safe. It’s essentially a giant pillow. Babies are safest on a flat and very firm surface.

Loose Blankets:

Out of all the things this is the most concerning to me. One of the blankets is literally covering his mouth and inches from his nose. We recommend swaddles are around the shoulders and leave the neck and face completely clear. When we do blanket swaddles we make sure to test to see that if the baby moves the swaddle will not begin to come undone. Loose blankets in the crib are a real risk of suffocation because the baby can turn their head but doesn’t have the capacity to pull the blankets off/away if it is covering their face/head.

Pacifier:

Not “wrong” at all. However, I felt like this is a good place to note that pacifiers are recommended as a SIDS reducer. And it’s totally fine for your newborn to fall asleep with a Paci.

Hat:

Once your baby is older than a few days it generally isn’t recommended to have them sleep with a hat. Babies become overheated very quickly and if you aren’t monitoring them it’s surprising how flushed and sweaty they can get even over the course of a short nap.

What she did right.

Her baby is on his back, it looks like he is swaddled, and he is in his own sleep space.

 

The Recommendations:

Instead of focusing on the do-nots, it’s easier to just work on some easy do’s:

  1. Put your baby to sleep on her back
  2. Put your baby to sleep with a pacifier
  3. Put your baby to sleep in her own sleep space
  4. Put your baby to sleep in a cool room [68-72 degrees]
  5. Put your baby to sleep in their sleep space with only your baby and a pacifier [nothing else!]

About Karina McCarthy

A Rhode Island native who has babies in her blood. A mom to a beautiful daughter and a lover of yoga and long naps.